The Blue Company

THE PLANETARY SPECTACLE CONTINUES

Triple award-winning Astroscope now as new special model

 

The planetary spectacle continues. MeisterSinger presents a special model limited to 100 pieces in luminous bright blue and yellow.

 

Triple awarding-winning spectacle …

The Astroscope displays the weekdays like they’ve never been shown before, i.e. related to the heavenly bodies that have been attributed to the various days since ancient times. The Astroscope has already won the German Design Award, the Red Dot Design Award, and the iF Design Award for its overall design concept.

 

… goes into the next act.

The new variant comes with a bright blue dial, reminiscent of a mild evening sky that appears after a sunny day. The numerals are depicted in a fine serif typeface and the astronomical symbols are designed in luminous yellow, which, together with the luminous hand, ensure that the wearer can tell the time with the Astroscope even after dark. Above the circular date window and the MeisterSinger logo there is an intimated horizon, enhancing the impression of gazing up at the heavens. The new model comes with a super-soft calfskin watchstrap in a yellow that beautifully matches the graphic depictions on the dial.

 

The day becomes an event

Just as most planets are named after Roman gods, most days of the week in both German and English take their corresponding names from Norse mythology. Throughout history, the allocation of the days of the week to celestial bodies has endured the test of time:

 

Monday, the Moon                 ☽

Tuesday, Mars                       ♂

Wednesday, Mercury            ☿

Thursday, Jupiter                   ♃

Friday, Venus                        ♀

Saturday, Saturn                   ♄

Sunday, the Sun                    ☉

With these celestial bodies and their classical symbols, the Astroscope displays the days of the week with a white dot, not in a linear or radial fashion, but wandering back and forth in a constellation that only occurs every ten to twelve years in the southern night sky of the northern hemisphere.

 

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